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Aug 23, 2016

Join the SELECTBIO Extracellular Vesicles Virtual Event made available from September 21st, and hear leading researchers talk about topics within EV biology and therapeutic potential!

 

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General information, events and/or links.

 

 

News

May 24, 2016

Guest lectures on Treg cells (and exosomes) June 3rd in auditorium Forum at Oslo Science Park (Forskningsparken)


Tobias Bopp: "Context- and Tissue-specific Regulation of Immunity and Tolerance by ILT3+ Regulatory T cells"

Theresa L. Whiteside: “The role of tumor-derived exosomes in shaping functions of human regulatory T cells (Treg)

Source: http://www.biotek.uio.no/english/research/news-and-events/events/

 

Hans Prydz guest lecture by Thomas Bopp

Professor Tobias Bopp is a Professor at Institute for immunology at University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz and works with mice that are double-deficient in the transcription factors NFATc2 and NFATc3.

Immunology Professor Bopp has a special focus on regulatory T cells (Tregs). Regulatory T cells are essential to prevent the induction of autoimmune diseases by inhibiting the activation of self-reactive T cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this cell contact-dependent process are still elusive. The main focus of the Bopp lab is to further characterize signaling pathways involved in the suppression of CD4+ T cells by Tregs and to further understand the mechanisms of Treg-mediated suppression. Bopp and colleagues recently identified a new Treg sub-population that can be distinguished by a molecule known as immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 (ILT3), a protein which is expressed on the surface of these cells.

'Context- and Tissue-specific Regulation of Immunity and Tolerance by ILT3+ Regulatory T cells'is his presentation for the Hans Prydz Guest Lecture series.

Thobias Bopp

Context- and Tissue-specific Regulation of Immunity and Tolerance by ILT3+ Regulatory T cells

Over the past two decades, Regulatory T cells (TREG cells) have been studied extensively by both basic and clinical immunologists. Although their exact mode of action still remains elusive, considerable advances have been made in the under- standing of the differentiation, homeostasis and tissue distribution of TREG cells.

In particular, there is growing evidence that TREG cells not only exert tissue- and cell type-specific suppressor functions but moreover can be divided into subtypes of TREG that specifically localize in certain tissues in health and disease cells. Thus, tissue-resident TREG cells might add another level of complexity in classification of TREG cell subtypes according to their unique phenotype and their cell type- and tissue-specific functional properties.

In this presentation, I will discuss the role of tissue-specific TREG cells with a special focus on the role of ILT3+ TREG cells in the maintenance of tolerance and the initiation of type 2 immune responses in the lung.

 

Hans Prydz guest lecture by Theresa L. Whiteside

Professor Theresa Whiteside is a clinical immunologist with many years of experience in evaluating human immune-mediated diseases. She is Professor of Pathology at the University of Pittsburg and also functioned as Director of the Immunologic Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute until 2010. In addition, Dr. Whiteside has adjunct appointments as Professor of Otolaryngology and Professor of Immunology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

Dr. Whiteside’s research expertise is in cellular and molecular cancer immunology. She works with various subsets of human immune cells and studies their functional impairments in patients with cancer. Tumor-mediated escape mechanisms are of special interest as are surrogate immunologic markers of prognosis and response to therapy in patients with cancer.

The role of tumor-derived exosomes in shaping functions of human regulatory T cells (Treg)” is her presentation for the Hans Prydz Guest Lecture series.

Theresa L. Whiteside

The role of tumor-derived exosomes in shaping functions of human regulatory T cells (Treg)

Human tumors produce and release into body fluids masses of exosomes, which are membrane-bound vesicles 50-150nm in diameter. TEX or tumor-derived exosomes carry a cargo of immunosuppressive molecules and deliver them to various recipient cells, including T cells. TEX deliver immunosuppressive messages to T effector cells but promote proliferation and up-regulate suppressor functions of Treg. TEX represents an efficient   mechanism used by tumor cells to interfere with anti-tumor immune responses. TEX can also modulate functions of inflammatory infiltrates and can interfere with immune therapies.

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